Life Science Compliance Update

« Previous article | Home| Next article »

April 04, 2017

JAMA Harps on PAOs

Pill_bottles_cash

JAMA Internal Medicine recently published an article, “Patient Advocacy Organizations, Industry Funding, and Conflicts of Interest.” The article focused on the nature of industry funding of patient advocacy organizations (PAOs) in the United States.

As the basis for the article, a survey was conducted from September 1, 2013, to June 30, 2014, of a nationally representative random sample of 439 PAO leaders, representing 5.6% of 7865 PAOs identified in the United States. Survey questions addressed the nature of their activities, their financial relationships with industry, and the perceived effectiveness of their conflict of interest policies.

Of the 439 surveys mailed to PAO leaders, 289 (65.8%) were returned with at least 80% of the questions answered. The PAOs varied widely in terms of size, funding, activities, and disease focus. The median total revenue among responding organizations was $299 140 (interquartile range, $70 000-$1 200 000). A total of 165 of 245 PAOs (67.3%) reported receiving industry funding, with 19 of 160 PAOs (11.9%) receiving more than half of their funding from industry. Among the subset of PAOs that received industry funding, the median amount was $50 000 (interquartile range, $15 000-$200 000); the median proportion of industry support derived from the pharmaceutical, device, and/or biotechnology sectors was 45% (interquartile range, 0%-100%). A total of 220 of 269 respondents (81.8%) indicated that conflicts of interest are very or moderately relevant to PAOs, and 94 of 171 (55.0%) believed that their organizations’ conflict of interest policies were very good. A total of 22 of 285 PAO leaders (7.7%) perceived pressure to conform their positions to the interests of corporate donors.

The study found that roughly two-thirds of a national sample of patient advocacy organizations (most of which were not for profit), reported receiving funding from for-profit companies. Twelve percent received the majority of their funding from industry; a median proportion of just under fifty percent of industry funding was derived from the pharmaceutical, device, and/or biotechnology sectors.

The authors of the study felt as though patient advocacy organizations engage in wide-ranging health activities. Although most PAOs receive modest funding from industry, a minority receive substantial industry support, raising added concerns about independence. Many respondents report a need to improve their conflict of interest policies to help maintain public trust.

Conclusion

As noted above, the article found that most advocacy organizations receive money from industry. Therefore, the authors of the study concluded that increased transparency and robust conflict of interest policies and practices are needed to help the non-profit organizations maintain their independence.

However, as we have noted time and time again, conflict of interest policies and practices (along with transparency efforts) are not always the answer, and are not usually required to help non-profit (or even for-profit) organizations maintain their independence.

Additionally, the sample size for the study was only 5.6% of the 7865 PAOs identified in the United States. This is such a small sample size, and any results assumed from such a small sample size, nationally representative or not, should not be taken as an impetus for change. Transparency is confusing to the general population, who typically care about getting the healthcare they need, when they need it. Patience assistance organizations play a large role in helping those who need healthcare and other related items get what they need – they should not be targeted as the new “bad guy.”

« Previous article | Home| Next article »

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

Verify your Comment

Previewing your Comment

This is only a preview. Your comment has not yet been posted.

Working...
Your comment could not be posted. Error type:
Your comment has been saved. Comments are moderated and will not appear until approved by the author. Post another comment

The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image. Please try again.

As a final step before posting your comment, enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below. This prevents automated programs from posting comments.

Having trouble reading this image? View an alternate.

Working...

Post a comment

Comments are moderated, and will not appear until the author has approved them.

Newsletter


Preview | Powered by FeedBlitz

Search


 
Sponsors
September 2017
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30