Life Science Compliance Update

« Previous article | Home| Next article »

June 08, 2015

Results from the First Two Years of the Pioneer Accountable Care Organization Model

ACO

On May 22, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) released a study evaluating the financial and quality outcomes for each accountable care organization (ACO) within the Pioneer Accountable Care Model for 2012 and 2013. The Pioneer ACO was created under the Affordable Care Act and is made up of health care providers and suppliers that voluntarily form individual ACOs to provide coordinated care to patients. The ultimate goal of this, and other ACOs, is to reduce spending and improve quality of care.

The Pioneer ACO model allows ACOs to earn additional Medicare payments if they generate savings but must pay CMS a penalty if spending is higher than expected. In this study GAO analyzed ACOs’ spending benchmarks, amount saved and lost, and payment amounts for shared savings or losses. The GAO found that fewer than half of the ACOs in the Pioneer ACO program earned shared savings in 2012 and 2013, although overall the Pioneer ACO Model produced net shared savings in each year.

The GAO report’s overview notes that 41% of the ACOs produced $139 million in total shared savings in 2012, and 48% percent produced $121 million in total shared savings in 2013. In 2012 and 2013 CMS paid ACOs $77 million and $68 million, respectively, for their shared savings. The Pioneer ACO Model produced net shared savings of $134 million in 2012 reflecting 2 percent of total expenditures for all 32 ACOs that participated in 2012. In 2013, it produced net shared savings of $99 million reflecting 1.4 percent of the total expenditures for the 23 ACOs that participated. The GAO also found that ACOs that participated in both years had significantly higher quality scores in 2013 than in 2012 for 67 percent of the quality measures.

ACOs with higher levels of prior spending likely had more capacity for achieving cost savings in the first two years of the model, for example, by reducing unnecessary services. As part of the GAO’s analysis, it compared the average expected expenditures (the spending benchmarks) for the Pioneer ACOs that achieved shared savings to the average expected expenditures for those ACOs that did not produce shared savings. In each year, GAO observed that the ACOs with shared savings had average expected expenditures that were about $1,100 higher, per beneficiary, compared to those ACOs that did not generate shared savings, absent other differences. For example, in 2013 the average expected expenditures for the 11 ACOs with shared savings ($12,426) was $1,160 higher, per beneficiary, than the average expected expenditures for the 12 ACOs without savings ($11,266).

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) provided technical support to assist the GAO in this study. HHS also offered general comments on the report. In its response, the agency stressed its commitment to ACOs like the Pioneer Model, calling it an “innovative initiative that is being used to test the impact of different payment arrangements in helping organizations who already have experience operating in ACO-like arrangements achieve the goals of providing better care to patients, and reducing Medicare costs.” HHS highlighted the fact that ACOs participating in the Pioneer Model for 2012 and 2013 had higher quality scores for a majority of the measures in the second year. Aside from trumpeting positive data, HHS concluded by stating the CMS will continue to test payment models that “incentivize providers to improve patient care and lower costs.”

With the recent MACRA SGR repeal legislation pushing physicians to choose between an unclear merit-based formula and alternative payment models like ACOs, it will be increasingly important to monitor developments in programs like the Pioneer Model. HHS continues to push post-Affordable Care Act projects, like their Health Care Payment Learning and Action Network, which strives to move healthcare from fee-for-service to quality and value-based care. We will continue to monitor these issues throughout the coming years.

« Previous article | Home| Next article »

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

The comments to this entry are closed.

Newsletter


Preview | Powered by FeedBlitz

Search


 
Sponsors
December 2017
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31